Mr. Bean's Holiday (2007) Review


Mr. Bean's Holiday is a 2007 comedy film based on the British television series Mr. Bean, as well as a standalone sequel to 1997's Bean. Directed by Steve Bendelack and written for the screen by Hamish McColl and Robin Driscoll (a writer on the TV series), from a story by Simon McBurney, it is a British-American venture produced by StudioCanal, Working Title Films and Tiger Aspect Films, and distributed by Universal Pictures. The film stars Rowan Atkinson in the title role, with Max Baldry, Emma de Caunes, Willem Dafoe and Karel Roden in supporting roles.
Mr. Bean's Holiday was theatrically released in the United Kingdom on 30 March 2007 and in the United States on 24 August 2007, to mixed reviews from critics but box office success, grossing $229.7 million worldwide against a $25 million budget.
In a raffle, Mr. Bean wins a holiday by train to Cannes, a video camera, and €200. Before catching his train, Bean causes chaos while sampling French seafood cuisine in a Paris restaurant.
On the platform at Gare de Lyon, Bean asks Russian movie director Emil Duchevsky to film him boarding the train using his new video camera. Bean keeps asking for retakes, until the train leaves with Bean and Duchevsky's son Stepan on the train and Duchevsky left behind.
Bean and Stepan get off at the next station. When Duchevsky's train passes through the station without stopping, he holds up a mobile phone number but inadvertently obscures the last two digits. Attempts to call the number are fruitless. They board the next train but Bean has left his wallet, passport, and ticket in the telephone booth and they are thrown off the train.
Bean busks as a mime and buys the pair bus tickets to Cannes. Bean manages to lose both his ticket and Stepan so he sets out walking and hitchhiking.
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